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  • Fax: 07 5676 9695
  • Email: info@footsurgery.com.au

Handouts

  • Bunion and Bunionette

     

    Bunion or Tailor’s Bunion (Bunionette)

    What is Bunion or Tailor’s Bunion?
    A bunion is a ‘bump’ on the joint at the base of the big toe known as first metatarsophalangeal joint (1stMPJ) – that occurs when the bone or tissue at the big toe joint moves out of place. The visible bump reflects changes in the bony framework of the front part of the foot. Bunion is a progressive disorder. They begin with a leaning of the big toe, gradually changing the angle of the bones over the years and slowly producing the characteristic bump, which continues to become increasingly prominent. Usually, the symptoms of bunions appear at later stages, although some people never have symptoms at any stages.

    A Tailor’s Bunion also known as a bunionette forms alongside your little toe. Tailor’s bunion results in the bony framework of the foot and a bump on the outside of the foot that is painful and irritated when your shoe presses against it. A Tailor’s Bunion can also be a bony spur (an outgrowth of bone) on the side of the fifth metatarsal head.

    What causes Bunions?
    It is still not clear what exactly causes bunion deformity, but possible causes are:

    Genetic (family history): If other members of your family have bunions you have a higher risk of developing a bunion, but it does not mean you will definitely develop one.
    Biomechanics of your feet: Abnormal function of joints in your feet can predispose to the development of bunion deformity.
    Arthritis: Rheumatoid, gouty, or psoriatic arthritis.
    Other conditions or syndromes: Cerebral palsy and Marfan’s syndrome – when ligaments are genetically loose.
    Poorly fitting shoes: pointy, narrow, or high-heeled shoes.

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational:
    Padding: Putting padding over the bunion area or spacer between first and second toe may relieve pain caused by the bunion rubbing.
    Wear extra-wide-fitting shoes:
    Custom-made orthoses may help relieve pain associated with bunion or may prevent it from becoming worse rapidly. Conservative treatments do not correct bunion deformity, these modalities are to reduce pain.

    Operational:
    Removal of bunion.
    Releasing tight ligaments, capsule and tightening loose ligaments. Cutting and realigning first metatarsal bone with fixation.
    Additional procedure may be warranted to correct the big toe. The operation can be done through keyhole incisions or through a traditional open approach. This is usually discussed during your consultation with Dr Kim.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs.

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving is 3-4 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one week. More active employment usually is considerably longer.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?

    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Bunion Handout

  • Corns and Calluses

     

    Corns and Calluses

    What is a Corn or Callus?
    Corns – also known as “heloma” in medical terms describes thick areas of skin that develops as a result of an excessive amount of pressure and friction being applied to the skin. Corns rather than being a defect, are our body’s protective mechanism from further damage.

    There are different types of corns that develop; hard corns known as heloma durum and soft corns known as heloma molle.

    Foot corns are hardened layers of skin and circular, they also have a translucent center with a dense knot of skin known as a core. They can become painful or ulcerated due to your skin’s response to friction, pressure or rubbing.

    Corns most often develop on the top of the toes, between the toes or on the soles of the feet.

    Calluses – are rarely painful, and usually develop on the soles of your feet, in particular under the heel and the ball of the foot.

    Varying in size and shape calluses are often larger than corns.

    What causes Corns or Calluses?
    Wearing ill-fitting shoes: tight shoes and high heels can compress areas of your feet. When footwear is too loose, your foot may repeatedly slide and rub against the shoe. Your foot may also rub against a seam or stitch inside the shoe.
    Skipping socks: wearing shoes and sandals without socks can cause friction on your feet. Socks that don’t fit properly can also be a problem.

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational:
    Moisturize your skin: Apply moisturizer to your feet to help keep the skin soft.
    Wear comfortable shoes and socks: Stick to well-fitting cushioned shoes and socks until your corn or callusdisappears.
    Avoid wearing tight/pointed shoes: **Do not use a corn pad as it contains salicylic-acids and when applied improperly, these corn pads can create a chemical burn in healthy tissue that may result in infections and ulcers.
    Regular podiatry visit: Podiatrists can reduce the painful corn by debridement and manufacture a custom-made toe separator to reduce excessive pressure.

    Operational:
    Corns: Surgery aims to remove the enlarged joint (arthroplasty), or the inflamed thickened tissue.

    Calluses: Typically, surgical removal of a callus is not required as the hard skin can most often be removed without surgery. In rare cases, foot surgery may be necessary to correct an underlying cause of the callus (eg. surgical removal of a bunion).

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs.

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving is 3-4 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one week. More active employment usually is considerably longer.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Corns and Calluses Handout

  • Flat Foot

     

    Flat Foot

    What is Flat Foot?
    Flat Foot is a partial or total loss of the arch on the inside of your foot. Some people may be born with flat foot and some may develop flat foot over time. Most people have no symptoms or only minor symptoms associated with flat feet, others may experience heel pain or arch pain or even knee/ hip pain. This can be in one foot or both feet and generally becomes progressively worse.

    Flat Foot may cause your foot/feet to roll inwards when standing, walking, or running. This can result in further issues like pain developing in your ankles, knees, or hips.

    What causes Flat Foot?
    Genetics: parents can pass this onto their children.
    Injury or Overuse: soft tissues such as tibialis posterior tendon or spring ligaments are damaged.
    Obesity: additional weight puts added stress on arches and tendons to cause the arch to flatten.
    Arthritis or Rheumatoid Arthritis: can irritate the tendon which may lead to flat foot.
    Neurological or Muscular Diseases: such as cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy, or spina bifida.

    How is it Treated?
    There is a revolutionary procedure called HyProCure surgery that has the potential to provide a permanent solution to pain and dysfunction caused by misaligned feet.

    Many people’s only option has been to undergo extensive surgery such as fusing of the major joints in the foot and ankle. This creates one solid bone and aims to eliminate pain from the moving joint. This type of treatment/surgery completely stops joint movement in your foot which means that you may not be able to wear those high heels, participate in your favorite sport or dance class and it may cause arthritis in adjacent joints later in your life.

    The purpose of the HyProCure procedure is to reduce any excessive movement in the rearfoot (known as the subtalar joint) so the foot can function optimally without eliminating it altogether. The implant is designed to remain in your foot permanently.

    The HyProCure implant is a small titanium stent that has been designed to be inserted in the subtalar joint, and acts as an internal orthotic for the foot. Abnormal pronation of the foot is now controlled at the source of the problem and you no longer need to rely on orthotics or orthopaedic shoes. HyProCure surgery is highly successful and also completely reversible which means that the implant can be removed and does not cause side effects.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs.

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving is 3-4 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one week. More active employment usually is considerably longer.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Flat Foot Handout

  • Freiberg's Disease

     

    Freiberg’s Disease

    What is Freiberg’s Disease?
    Freiberg’s Disease also known as Freiberg infraction, is osteochondrosis (Avascular Necrosis) of the metatarsal head that most often occurs in the second metatarsal head although it can happen to any metatarsal head.

    Physical stress causes multiple tiny fractures which then impairs blood flow to the metatarsal head. Without blood the bone cells die, and the bone and joint surface may collapse.

    Freiberg’s Disease can become a debilitating condition and if not treated properly arthritic changes can occur. It commonly presents in adolescence with a 5:1 female: male ratio.

    What causes Freiberg’s Disease?
    Although not fully understood, the most likely cause is a combination of trauma and vascular insufficiency.

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational:
    Initial treatment is usually directed toward protection and the alleviation of discomfort.
    Immobilization with limitation of activity for 4-6 weeks.
    Anti-inflammatories to reduce inflammation, swelling and pain.
    Bone Stimulator to promote bone healing.

    Operational:
    As the disease process progresses, or the acute phase has passed, or the joint has deteriorated, surgical intervention may be of benefit. Depending on the severity of the condition, your surgeon will recommend different procedures.

    Cheilectomy with a clean-up of the joint and removal of any osteophytes.
    Removal of damaged cartilage.
    Decompression of the joint by metatarsal shortening osteotomy.
    Interpositional arthroplasty or joint replacement.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs.

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving is 3-4 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one week. More active employment usually is considerably longer.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Freiberg’s Disease Handout

  • Ganglion Foot Cyst

     

    Ganglion Foot Cyst

    What is Ganglion Foot Cyst?
    The most common soft tissue growth found in the body/foot is a ganglion cyst which is not cancerous. Typically forming off a joint capsule or tendon sheath the growth is a gel-filled cyst.

    Ganglion cysts can be as small as a pea-size, while larger ones can be as big as a golf ball.

    Usually not painful, but ganglion cysts can be irritated by shoe pressure against a nearby nerve and can sometimes affect joint movement.

    If large enough it can limit the types of shoes you can wear.

    If you have a cyst on the top of your toes just behind the toenail this is known as a mucinous cyst. It can look like a translucent lesion or like a blister.

    What causes a Ganglion Foot Cyst?
    Simple wear and tear: on a particular tendon or joint are believed to be the cause of a ganglion.
    Trauma or injury: whether a single event or repetitive microtrauma, the tissue of the joint breaks down.
    Age and sex: Ganglion cysts can develop in anyone, but they are most frequent in women between 20-40.
    Arthritis: If you have a mucinous cyst, it may be due to some degenerative joint disease in the last joint of the affected toes.

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational:
    Close monitoring: if ganglions are not causing pain or interfering with movement, it may be left alone. The cyst may simply disappear on its own or change in size.
    Needle aspiration: one of the tests to diagnose ganglions involves drawing off the fluid with a fine needle. In many cases (around 50%) this treatment empties the cyst, and no further treatment is needed.

    Operational:
    The cyst is surgically removed.
    The excision surgery involves removal of the mass and a small amount of the tissue of origin.
    This can be performed safely under local anaesthetic. For those patients who do not like the thought of needles, the procedure can be performed as day surgery under general or twilight anaesthetic.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

     

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs.

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving after ganglion removal is 2 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, you may be able to work immediately. More active employment usually is 2-3 weeks.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Ganglion Foot Cyst Handout

  • Hallux Rigidus

     

    Hallux Rigidus

    What is Hallux Rigidus?
    Hallux Rigidus refers to a condition where your big toe joint (1st MTP joint) loses its range of motion. This condition can be troubling and painful as we use our big toe joint whenever we walk, stoop down, climb up or even stand.

    Since Hallux Limitus is a progressive condition, the toe’s motion decreases as time goes on and reaches the end stage of condition known as Hallux Rigidus where you completely lose range of motion at the big toe joint.

    When Hallux Rigidus advances to a point where your big toe cartilage erodes, everything you do with your feet becomes increasingly tricky and painful. You cannot engage in walking, sports and even household or social activities.

    What causes Hallux Rigidus?
    Faulty biomechanics and structural abnormalities: Abnormal pronation may put excessive pressure on the big toe that then needs to work harder to push off and move the body forward, then joint cartilage becomes overly compressed and damaged.
    Previous injury to the big toe joint: Stubbing the big toe or dropping a heavy object on the big toe joint.
    Frequent wearing of high heel shoes or tight shoes:
    Overuse: In activities or jobs that increase the stress on the big toe joint such as workers who have to stoop or squat.
    Inflammatory arthritis: Rheumatoid or gouty arthritis or Osteoarthritis.

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational: Self-care at home
    It should aim to reduce the inflammation, swelling and pain.
    Rest the foot taking weight off the joint.
    Wear shoes with a rigid sole, a wide and deep toe box, and no raised heel.

    Non-operational: Professional treatment
    Anti-inflammatory/Pain medications:
    Orthotics to compensate for abnormal pronation or sometimes limit the motion at the big toe joint.
    Ultrasound guided Steroid injection:

    Operational:
    Depending on the stage of your hallux rigidus and your symptoms, the type of surgery performed varies.
    Cheilectomy: Usually recommended for mild to moderate deformity and aims to increase range of motion by removing bone spurs and a portion of bone to allow more room for the toe to bend and alleviate pain.
    Arthrodesis: Is recommended for moderate to severe hallux rigidus where joint damage is severe. The damaged cartilage is removed from both sides of the joint and two bones are fused together with screws and/or plate. It mainly aims to eliminate the arthritis and pain.
    Cartiva Surgery: A synthetic cartilage implant designed to replace your damaged cartilage. The new implant consists of durable, bio-compatible, and slippery organic polymer that has the same functionalities to natural cartilage. Cartiva implant surgery does not carry the risk of bacterial or viral infection. It is designed to withstand loading and reduce any chances of systematic irritation. After Cartiva Surgery there is less bone healing required. This is opposed to fusion surgery, Cartiva Surgery does not have a long recovery time. Patients can enjoy their lifestyle as they start their recovery process.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs.

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving is 3-4 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one week. More active employment usually is considerably longer.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Hallux Rigidus Handout

  • Hammertoe

     

    Hammertoe (or claw toe or mallet toe)

    What is Hammertoe, Claw toe or Mallet toe?
    The small toes are important in walking, especially when pushing off with the foot towards the next step. They share the pressure with the big toe and the ball of the foot. Toes become deformed when the pressure on the toes are stronger than their joints can resist. This may be because the joints are weak or the pressures strong, or both.

    The joints may be weak because they have been damaged by injury or arthritis. The muscles that control them may become unbalanced, so that one set pulls harder than others and causes the toe to bend. In some people the tissues in the lower part of the joint at the base of the toe (metatarsophalangeal joint or MTPJ) become weak, allowing the base of the toe to drift upwards and unbalancing it.

    There are different types of small toe deformities:
    Claw toe: Involves an upward bending of the toe joint at the ball of the foot.  At the middle joint and sometimes the end joint, the toe bends downward in a claw-like fashion often digging into the sole of the foot. This can occur in any toes except the big toe.

     

    Hammertoe: The toe is bent at the middle joint causing a curling of the toe. Most common in the second toe but can occur in any toes. Hammertoes are often present along with a bunion deformity.

     

    Mallet toe: Similar to hammertoe, except the joint involved is the last joint (DIPJ) instead of the knuckle joint (MPJ), giving the toe a mallet-like appearance at the end of the toe.

    What causes Hammertoe, Claw toe or Mallet toe?
    Poorly fitting shoes: usually wearing shoes that are too short.
    High arched foot:
    Genetics / Bunions / Rheumatoid arthritis / Diabetes / Tendon imbalance:
    Underlying neurological condition such as Charcot Marie tooth disease.

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational:
    Padding: Putting padding between your toes and strapping them in place may help to stop pain caused by toes rubbing.
    Orthotic devices: Custom orthotic devices can reduce excessive pressure from painful areas.
    Shoes: with wider and deeper toe areas can also help you get around more easily.
    Regular visit to podiatrist: to remove painful hard skin can help reduce pain in the short term over the bunion area or spacer between first and second toe may relieve pain caused by the bunion rubbing.

    Operational:
    Depends on the problems with your toes. Your surgeon will discuss which procedures your operation is likely to involve.

    Releasing or lengthening tendons.
    Putting joints back into place.
    Straightening a toe by removing some bone.
    Stiffening one of the toe joints.
    Changing the shape of metatarsal bone to shorten or lift it away from the skin on the ball of the foot.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs. 

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving is 3-4 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one week. More active employment usually is considerably longer.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Hammertoe Handout

  • Ingrown Toenails

     

    Ingrown Toenail

    What is an Ingrown Toenail?
    When a toenail is ingrown, it is curved and grows into the skin, usually at the nail border (the sides of the nail). This digging in of the nail irritates the skin, often creating pain, redness, swelling and warmth in the toe.

    If an ingrown nail causes a break in the skin, bacteria may enter and cause an infection in the area, which is often marked by drainage and a foul odour. However, even if the toe is not painful, red, swollen, or warm, a nail that curves downward into the skin can progress to an infection.

    What causes an Ingrown Toenail?
    Heredity: In many people, the tendency for ingrown toenails is inherited.
    Trauma: Sometimes an ingrown toenail is the result of trauma, such as stubbing your toe, having an object fall on your toe or engaging in activities that involve repeated pressure on the toes, such as kicking or running.
    Improper trimming: The most common cause of ingrown toenails is cutting your nails too short. This encourages the skin next to the nail to fold over the nail.
    Improperly sized footwear: Ingrown toenails can result from wearing socks and shoes that are tight or short.
    Nail conditions: Ingrown toenails can be caused by nail problems, such as fungal infections or losing a nail due to trauma. 

    How is it Treated?
    PNA + Phenolisation Procedure:
    The initial approach to fix an ingrown toenail is a partial nail avulsion with phenolisation, and it works very well.
    It does not require going to the hospital and is performed under local anaesthetic. It is very affordable and reliable.
    After applying a local anaesthetic, Dr Kim removes part of the nail’s side border.
    Following the nail procedure, a light bandage will be applied. Most people experience very little pain after surgery and may resume normal activity the next day.
    This procedure provides excellent long-term results with only a slight risk of recurrence.

    Winograd Procedure:
    The classic nail surgery that is usually indicated for ingrown toenail with hypergranulation (overgrown tissue) in the nailfold, or previously failed ingrown toenail surgery.
    This procedure involves removal of ingrown nail plate excision and nail matrix. The excellent results have been reported in the literature.

    Both ingrown toenail procedures are usually carried out in our state-of-the-art procedure room unless patients are needle phobic requiring general anaesthesia.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have ingrown toenails.

     

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    PNA + Phenolisation            (45 minutes)        $500
    – additional side                                               $100

    Winograd                             (45 minutes)        $500
    – additional side                                               $100

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    After nail surgery you can resume daily activities immediately. High impact exercises should be avoided for 2-4 weeks after the procedure.

    When can I drive?
    Patients can drive immediately after nail surgery.

    When can I fly?
    Patients can fly immediately after nail surgery.

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, you can go back to work one day after the procedure. More active employment usually requires 3-4 days off work.

    What are the risks?
    Nail surgery is considered very safe although not without risks/complications.

    The main risks/complications are –
    *Infection
    *Regrowth
    *Pain
    *Swelling

    Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

     

    There is no waiting time and no rebooking for

    the procedure – walk in with an ingrown toenail

    and walk out without one!

     

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Ingrown Toenail Handout

  • Morton's Neuroma

     

    Morton’s Neuroma

    What is a Morton’s Neuroma?
    A neuroma is a thickening of nerve tissue and Morton’s Neuroma is a swollen, inflamed common digital nerve located between the bones at the ball of the foot.

    The most common location is second (between second and third metatarsal) and third (between third and fourth metatarsal) spaces.

    This can cause a sharp, burning, shooting pain in the ball of your foot and sometimes the pain radiates to the toes.

    Often referred to as a pinched nerve or nerve tumour, it is five times more common in women due to the wearing of narrow shoes or high heels.

    To ease the pain of the thickened nerves those suffering often have to stop walking, take off their shoe and massage the affected area. Which is not ideal to enjoying your best life and participating in sports, dance or working all day whilst standing.

    What causes a Morton’s Neuroma?
    Although the exact causes are still unclear, anything that causes compression or irritation of the nerve may be believed to cause a neuroma.

    Ill-fitting footwear: shoes with a narrow toe box, high heel shoes or shoes with pointed toes.
    Being active: playing high impact sports that involve running and placing high pressure on the forefoot such as racquet sports.
    Foot deformities: such as Pes planus (flat foot), bunion and hammertoe, tight calf muscle (equinus deformity).

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational:
    Padding: Padding techniques to support the metatarsal arch, thereby reducing the pressure on the nerve and decreasing the compression when walking.
    Icing: Placing an icepack on the affected area helps reduce swelling.
    Orthotic devices: Custom orthotic devices provide the support needed to reduce pressure and compression on the nerve.
    Activity modifications: Activities that put repetitive pressure on the neuroma should be avoided until the condition improves.
    Shoe modifications: Wear shoes with a wide toe box and avoid narrow-toed shoes or shoes with high heels. Medications: Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, may be recommended to reduce pain and inflammation.
    Injection therapy: Treatment may include injection of cortisone, local anaesthetic, or other agents such as sclerosing alcohol injection.

    Operational:
    Morton’s Neuroma surgery (neurectomy surgery) can be done as a day surgery procedure as it only requires a small incision of 2-3 cm to take the neuroma out. Surgical excision of a Morton’s Neuroma has good clinical results and high overall patient satisfaction in the long term.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs.

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving is 3-4 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one week. More active employment usually is considerably longer.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Morton’s Neuroma Handout

  • Plantar Fasciitis

     

    Plantar Fasciitis

    What is Plantar Fasciitis?
    Plantar Fasciitis (or fasciopathy) is inflammation with/without degeneration at the origin of Plantar Fascia – a thick tissue band at the bottom of the foot that runs from the toes to the heel. The main role of the tissue is to support your foot, act as a shock absorber, and support walking.

    Plantar Fasciitis is very prevalent, affecting one in ten people in their lifetime. Around 90% of cases will resolve within 12 months with conservative treatment.

    People suffering from Plantar Fasciitis complain of heel pain. The pain is worse in the morning immediately after waking up, after long hours of sitting or at the end of the day.

    Heel pain reduces after a few minutes of walking or doing an activity that stretches the Fascia. However, for some people, the pain reduces and returns after spending hours on their feet.

    What causes Plantar Fasciitis?
    Non-supportive footwear: wearing shoes without cushions or walking barefoot on hard surfaces.
    Very high arched feet or very flat feet: can affect the weight distribution putting stress on the tendons.
    Overweight or Obese: extra weight puts increased pressure on your plantar fascia ligaments.
    Ageing: wear and tear on the plantar fascia over time.
    Walking or standing for long periods on hard surfaces can damage the plantar fascia.
    Injury or trauma to the heel:

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational:
    Stretching: Doing stretching exercise to ease pain.
    Footwear: Wearing shoes with excellent arch support to reduce stress on Plantar Fascia. Avoid going barefoot.
    Activity modification: Avoiding strenuous physical activities to rest your heel.
    Custom orthotics / Night splint:
    Ultrasound guided Steroid injection (cortisone): To reduce inflammation and ease the pain.
    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) injection:
    Radiofrequency ablation (Rhizotomy):
    Extracorporeal shockwave therapy: Sends high pressured acoustic shock waves through the skin to stimulate pain relief and tissue repair.

    Operational:
    Plantar Fasciitis surgery (Plantar Fasciotomy) can be done as a day surgery procedure under local anaesthesia, twilight sedation or general anaesthesia. The operation usually takes around 20-30 minutes.
    A small incision (usually 2-3 cm in length) under the arch area is made directly on the sole of the foot. The tight band (plantar fascia) is then released 1/3 to 1/2 of the medial plantar fascia. Once the tightness in the plantar fascia is loosened, skin is closed with one or two sutures.
    Operation may also be done through a keyhole incision if there is a large heel spur present.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Costs of surgery varies depending on the procedures required for your deformities. During your first consultation, Dr Kim will assess your condition and give you a written quote so you can contact your private health insurance to find out your out-of-pocket costs.

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    Most foot surgery allows patients to be on their feet immediately following the procedure but are expected to wear a protective post-operative shoe over their bandaging to protect the surgical site. In the first 3-7 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they are able to walk. At your first post-operative review (usually 7 days following), Dr Kim will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes. For the majority of patients, a return to normal footwear occurs at 3-4 weeks following the procedure although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Generally speaking, no patient should drive a motor vehicle in the first week following surgery. From then on, it is very much dependent on the type of procedure performed. The average time taken off driving is 3-4 weeks.

    When can I fly?
    Not in the first week. The decision to fly is made on an individual basis for each patient and procedure performed. Flying too soon following surgery can prolong swelling and may theoretically increase the risk of blood clots in the legs (deep vein thrombosis).

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one week. More active employment usually is considerably longer.

    What are the risks?
    Elective foot surgery is very safe. The risks of foot surgery are similar to those of other surgeries such as infection and deep vein thrombosis. There are also risks associated with having certain medicines during and after surgery, such as nausea and vomiting. Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Plantar Fasciitis Handout

  • Plantar Warts

     

    Plantar Warts

    What are Plantar Warts?
    Plantar Warts are a small growth on the skin that develops when the skin is infected by a virus. Warts can appear anywhere on the foot, but typically they appear on the bottom (plantar side) of the foot. Plantar Warts most commonly occur in children, adolescents, and the elderly.

    The symptoms of a plantar wart may include:
    Thickened skin: often a plantar wart resembles a callus because of its tough, thick tissue.
    Pain: Walking and standing may be painful. Squeezing the sides of the wart may also cause pain.
    Tiny black dots: These often appear on the surface of the wart. The dots are actually dried blood contained in the capillaries (tiny blood vessels).

    Plantar warts grow deep into the skin. Usually this growth occurs slowly, with the wart starting small and becoming larger over time. Although there are many folk remedies for warts, patients should be aware that these remain unproven and may be dangerous. Patients should never try to remove warts themselves. This can do more harm than good.

    What causes Plantar Warts?
    HPV (human Papillomavirus): that enters your body through tiny cuts, breaks or other weak spots on the bottom of your feet.

    How is it Treated?
    Treatments may be operational or non-operational.

    Non-operational:
    Medication: to ease any pain.
    Salicylic acid: softening the outer layer of your skin allowing it to loosen and shed.
    Cryotherapy: application of extremely low temperatures to destroy abnormal or diseased tissue.
    Laser treatment: to cauterize the tiny blood vessels. The infected tissue eventually dies, and the wart falls off.
    Immune therapy: your doctor may inject your warts with a foreign substance (antigen) or apply a solution or cream to the warts.

    Operational:
    In some cases, surgical excision may be necessary. The surgeon can perform a tibial nerve block with local anaesthetic and the plantar wart can be removed without the need to go to the hospital.

    Surgical excision allows you to walk immediately following the procedure, although you will be advised and expected to rest for 48-72 hours following the procedure to reduce the incidence and risk of bleeding.

    Plantar wart procedures are usually carried out in our state-of-the-art procedure room unless patients are needle phobic requiring general anaesthesia.

    When is Surgery needed?
    Surgery is considered in patients who have not responded well to non-surgical treatments.

    Costs
    Initial Consultation              (30 minutes)         $160
    Subsequent Consultation    (30 minutes)         $120

    Wart Surgery (60 minutes – 90 minutes)          $480
    – each additional wart                                      $100

    FAQ
    Do I need a referral?
    No referral is required to see Dr Kim unless you are claiming DVA or Workers Compensation, which requires specific referral paperwork, and cannot be seen without this.

    Are you an Orthopaedic Surgeon?
    No, I am not. I am a Podiatric Surgeon who is also recognized as a specialist under AHPRA.

    How long will I be off my feet?
    In the first 2-3 days, patients are expected to rest as much as possible even when they can walk.

    At your first post-operative review (usually 5-7 days following), Dr Km will discuss your progress and anticipated recovery, as well as your progression into normal footwear such as runners and flat casual shoes.

    For most patients, a return to normal footwear occurs one week following the procedure, although this does vary.

    When can I drive?
    Patients can drive one day after the procedure.

    When can I fly?
    Patients can fly one week after the procedure.

    When can I work again?
    If you work at a desk with minimal time on your feet, it may be as early as one day after the procedure. For more active employment usually 1-2 weeks after the procedure.

    What are the risks?
    Any risks associated with surgery are explained during a pre-operative consultation at which time written consent is given. Absolute care is taken to ensure that consent to undergo surgery is only given once all questions have been answered to the patient’s satisfaction and all possible risks have been explained.

    About Us
    Dr Ji Soo, Kim is a highly qualified foot specialist, holding both a Bachelor of Podiatric Medicine and a Doctor of Clinical Podiatry.

    He holds dual registration with AHPRA as both a podiatrist and a specialist podiatric surgeon and is a fellow of the Australian Association of Podiatric Surgeons.

    Dr Kim and the team at Brisbane and Gold Coast Foot Surgery are dedicated to working with you to accomplish the best possible outcomes for your foot health, mobility, and quality of life.

    Specializing in conditions affecting the feet and ankles for patients both young and old. This is achieved with treatments or surgery that will help you regain your lifestyle, movement, and mobility so you don’t miss out on living your life to the fullest.

    Why Choose Us?
    Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary, he will thoroughly explain procedure and risks/ complications.

    Dr Kim believes the post-op care is the most important, so his mobile number is given to all patients after surgery to make sure he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery or when he is needed.

    What is Podiatric Surgery?
    Podiatric surgery is a specialty of the podiatry profession that specializes in the surgical and non-surgical treatment of foot, ankle, and related extremity structures. Podiatric surgeons are recognized as registered specialists by AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) and perform hospital-based surgery within private hospital and licensed day surgery centers.

    Information about Medicare & Private Health Insurances.
    Podiatric surgery is currently not covered under Medicare. Most private health insurance funds provide rebates for a range of podiatric surgery services, including hospital costs and surgeon’s costs, but this depends on your level of cover.

    If your private health insurance only covers a small part of podiatric surgery, you may change your health insurance to one that does choose to cover some or all of this service, lobby your fund to change its policy and/or provide you with what is called an ‘ex-gratia’ payment.

    Plantar Warts Handout

Why Choose Us

Dr Kim takes his time to clearly explain non-surgical and surgical treatments of your problems and if surgery is deemed necessary,
he will thoroughly explain procedures and risks/complications.
Dr Kim’s mobile number is given to patients after surgery so he is only a phone call away if you have any questions about your recovery.

  • ADVANCED SURGICAL TECHNIQUES/METICULOUS SURGICAL APPROACHES

    Improvement and advancement in the surgical techniques in the foot including newer and safer implants allow a speedier recovery/return to work and minimal postoperative pain following foot surgery. Dr Kim is at the forefront of using these safer technologies from around the world, to improve the outcome of surgery and patients’ satisfaction.


    Dr Kim offers less invasive, meticulous dissection, a smaller incision and gentle tissue handling that enable an easy and short recovery, with results that are more optimal. See “before and after photos

  • MINIMAL POSTOPERATIVE PAIN AND FAST RECOVERY

    The advanced prostheses and minimally invasive technique implemented by Dr Kim allows little damage to the surrounding tissues and this allows minimal postoperative pain as well as fast recovery. Although pain is subjective and differs from person to person, it is not uncommon to see that patients report minimal discomfort post operatively.

  • APPROPRIATE ANAESTHETICS

    For some patients, general anaesthesia is a risk and/or a financial burden. Many procedures at Brisbane Gold Coast Foot Surgery can be safely performed under local anaesthetics with/without sedation on a daily case basis. During your appointment Dr Kim will explain the pros and cons of each anaesthetic for your procedure.